As children we rarely understand how to monitor our body. We may suddenly feel weak, not knowing why, and we depend on our parents to correct our actions. We end up inheriting the knowledge and wisdom of our parents, who were nurtured in similar ways by their parents, thus shaping an entire generation upon a range of perspectives. It becomes so acceptable to view health and body in a particular way, that an entire culture keeps the new maturing intelligences on a fixed path.

Our parents have gone through many experiences to determine, by our behavior, what is affecting us adversely which could give us a guide on how to monitor the body’s activities and symptoms. However, we are limited to the level of observational skills and education they attained, which in many cases is compromised by the self-inflicted “numbing lifestyles” they choose to live or has been handed down to them.

The body receives substances from the foods we eat and must utilize the transporting properties of water to handle and distribute materials – so called “nutrients”. The body depends on adequate water in order to break down these materials into an adequate size (catabolism), so when water does not enter in proper proportions to the ingested substances the body must compensate by allocating water from the surrounding tissues.

Therefore, many people experience physical exhaustion after a meal. They find themselves having to ”rest and digest” before they can return to work. Simply, their body is too low on its water reserves to handle the load, therefore water from different areas in the body is relocated to the basic processes of digestion and elimination. This temporary allocation of water from the muscles, joints and nervous system places people in a trance state and impairs their motor skills.

Dehydration is an event; albeit
a physiologically impairing event.

It has the potential of temporarily reducing your performance, or tricking your biology into operating under “lesser than optimal” conditions.

It has been scientifically documented that when babies are born they come into the world with 75% water by weight. However, when statistics were drawn for adults, the percentage of water reported is between 50-60%. Even more so, obese people have less than 50% water by weight[1][2]. Why, where did all that water disappear to? One can simply explain this away by choosing to see it as a matter of natural growth consequences, but when taking into consideration that every cell has a need for a specific volume of water in order to operate optimally, than that explanation falls between the cracks.

For such a drastic alteration in the volume of water to occur, one has to undergo a series of episodes, whereby the body had been stressed in varying ways and not  allowed to recover in between. Instead of recognizing the real issue and replenishing the fluid needs of the body, we end up acclimating to the new volume capacity of water available. Thus our performance gradually declines, year after year, episode after episode, until acidity conditions accumulate and a suitable environment for degenerative diseases develops.

Back when I was in middle school, I had a dehydration episode while out on a school fieldtrip. While hiking with my classmates, I was struck with searing pain in my lower right abdomen. My parents went out of their way to pick me up and take me to an emergency room. The fear was that I may be experiencing a ruptured appendicitis, but turns out I was simply dehydrated. Cases like these are not unheard of. People suffer from headaches, migraines, fatigue or inflammatory bowels and never consider the possibility that it could originate from improper fluid management. They simply experience the crisis and depend on others to relieve their suffering.

I didn’t recognize back then, even after my episode, the importance of adequate water intake which could explain much of the issues my body had as time went on. I’ve had many episodes following too much sun exposure, or long flights without water, or times when I would binge on meals and fall into a food coma. In each case, the body was stretched to its limits and lit warning signs. The body wanted me to pay closer attention to a missing element it needed so desperately, to question my situation and rectify the problem at its root before severe damage occurs.

Given that we are sacks of water
holding up a carbon-based frame,
the loss of fluid is the loss of cellular integrity.

Our desire from our body to express movement exerts its own demands on the battery cells to fulfill our wishes. However, the body is made of local materials in a composition that permits the fluid nature of thought to be expressed through our mechanical apparatus.

Where each person ends up in life is determined by the collection of self-realizations they attained. Knowing something crucial about your physiology, as crucial as the effect of dehydration on its performance, can aid you in better self-assessments and real recoveries from injuries and diseases. Overeating and vigorous exercise are actions that may lead you into episodes of physical stress. Such actions exert demands from the organism for water to be allocated to simple processes of digestion, elimination, energy production and tissue recovery. When the body doesn’t receive adequate water as a prevention or recovery measure, bodily processes stagnate and overall performance is impacted.

To integrate further wisdom, I have designed and produced a course called ”Water and Physiology”, which builds you up, concept by concept, to comprehend your physiology and eliminate the preconceived misconceptions. Empower yourself; take your physiology to the next level – to its original level it was always designed to be.

References:

[1] Body Water – Wikipedia

[2] The Water in You – U.S. Geological Survey